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This historic Fayetteville home was constructed in 1847 for the attorney, judge, and state political leader David Walker. Local business owner Steven Stone acquired the property three years later. On October 3, 1864, the west side of the home was hit by cannon fire that came from Confederate lines as they attempted to thwart the Union advance into this part of Arkansas. The historic home fell into disrepair during the mid-20th century when it was divided into four apartments, but the building was restored by one of Stone's grandsons in the 1970s and is now the location of a local law office.


  • This home was constructed for attorney David Walker who became one of the first justices in the Arkansas Supreme Court.

David Walker became one of the first justices in the Arkansas Supreme Court. The Stone family operated a grocery that expanded to include hardware and furniture. Amanda Stone bore seven children, including Benjamin Stone whose son Edward Durrell Stone became a leading architect in the region. The Stones were leading citizens and supporters of the Fayetteville Female Seminary. Their daughter Mary was the final woman to graduate from the Seminary in 1860. 

Stone House. US Dept of the INterior, National Register of Historic Places Nomination Form. May 26, 1970. Accessed November 10, 2018. National Register of Historic Places Nomination Form.