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As you can see in the title, this spring has been identified with many different names. The spring was first called High Top from owner Isaac Lain but became known as High View. Within a few short years was then changed to Acme. It was later then sold and became Carleton. By the 1970s the spring had ceased flowing, most likely due to the extension of a street through the hillside. The limestone structure that is seen today is due to the restoration effort of the City of Waukesha Landmarks Commission with the cooperation of previous apartment building owner - Bryce Styza.


  • Acme Spring showing damage to top stone
  • 1956  Acme Spring and Hubbard Boarding House

The land on which thee springs were located was on the west side of St. Paul Avenue, just north of the Wisconsin Avenue bridge. The first mention of a spring there was in an 1879 Freeman article that mentioned that Isaac Lain (a local businessman) had fixed iron pipes to his spring to use the water for street sprinkling. Later, Lain developed a park around his spring and called it High View Spring. In 1883 or 1884, the name was changed to Acme. Acme water was shipped to Chicago via rail car. The 1892 plat map of Waukesha showed that another spring, Sunnyside, was located on the property.

Eventually the spring fell into the hands of one of its managers, George Carleton. He did not develop the spring, but here were published reports in 1914 that he considered doing so.

The limestone structure built into the hill sat neglected and forlorn for many years. The water stopped running in the 1970's when a street was extended through the hill.

In 1995, the Landmarks Commission, along with owner Bryce Styza, restore the limestone structure.

, Waukesha Landmarks Commission. Spring City's Past.

Image Sources(Click to expand)

Bob Salb Photo

Waukesha County Museum - detail of aerial photo