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The Pavilion was the heart of Myrtle Beach for decades. It supplied happiness and enjoyment to thousands of locals and tourists alike. From humble beginnings the park turned into a sprawling amusement park that was an icon of the beach. The park was at the center of the beach and was a staple until 2006.


  • The sign for the Myrtle Beach Pavilion.
  • The kid's section Pavilion in the 1950's.
  • July 4 celebration at the Pavilion.

In 1938, the city of Myrtle Beach was incorporated into Horry county. From then the beach has progressively a tourist destination. People have been drawn to the beach over the decades and the population has skyrocketed. The influx of residence and tourists presented a business opportunity. In 1948, a traveling circus came to Conway for the Tobacco Festival. Eventually they signed a deal with the Myrtle Beach Farmers Association. The contract stated that the carnival stayed and performed at the beach. This lasted for only two years.[1] After the two years, Burroughs and Chapin bought carnival and turned it into the Myrtle Beach Pavilion. There business strategy was to capitalize on the flow of tourists to the beach and create another attraction. The small 11 acres of land, was being turned into the foot print of an amusement park. One year later, 14 carnival style rides had been constructed for the opening of the Pavilion. Over the years, the ride count more than doubled to 34 rides and several other attractions. Often the rides were damaged because of hurricanes which led to the development of the on and off seasons. In the late 1970's the park added its first roller coasters, which was named after the come weather event the "Hurricane."[2]

           Although, Pavilion grew over the years and many rides were added and changed, but one thing did not, the love that the visitor. Generations of locals went to the Pavilion, grandparents could bring their grand-kids to first amusement park they went too. There was a connection that the locals had to the Pavilion that words cannot do justice. It was almost as old as the city itself and was a land mark in the area. It was Myrtle Beach's amusement park, it was our park. In 2006, Burroughs and Chapin announced that this would be the last year that the park would be operating. They blamed "financial instability" of the park to be the reason of its closing. This came as a shock to a majority of the community. That year the park proceeded to have the most profitable years of the parks lifetime. The number of people and tickets sold doubled the previous years. People went not only to spend one last day at the park, but they wanted to show Burroughs and Chapin that people still loved the park so that the park would be kept open. The effort was in vain because no matter how much money they made the park was still close on September 24, 2006 and the rides were either sold or scraped.[3] Recently, there was a proposal from a traveling circus to set up in the area that was the Pavilion grounds. Although, there was some local support for the idea, the City of Myrtle Beach denied them a permit.[4]  Once, a staple of Myrtle beach has been replaced with a zip-line.  

           The site itself is gone, but the memories that were created there are still impacting people. This was the amusement park of Myrtle Beach and since its closing no other parks have been able to succeed at the beach. Ultimately it can never be replaced and will continue to be missed.  

[1]Hardee, Lesta. McDonald, Janice. Images Of America: The Myrtle Beach Pavilion. Charleston, SC: Arcadia Publishing, 2010.

[2] Hardee, Lesta. McDonald, Janice. Images Of America: The Myrtle Beach Pavilion. Charleston, SC: Arcadia Publishing, 2010.

[3] Mowder, Chris. "Remembering The Pavilion: A Decade Later, We Look Back at the Legacy of a Local Icon." Myrtle Beach.com. City of Myrtle Beach, September 24, 2016. https://www.myrtlebeach.com/pavilion/?utm_source=GeniusMonkey_VT.

[4] "Proposed carnival won't seek permit for downtown spot." WMBF Online. WMBF, April 19, 2013. https://www.wmbfnews.com/story/22026949/mb-city-council-opposes-new-attraction/.

Hardee, Lesta. McDonald, Janice. Images Of America: The Myrtle Beach Pavilion. Charleston, SC: Arcadia Publishing, 2010.

Mowder, Chris. "Remembering The Pavilion: A Decade Later, We Look Back at the Legacy of a Local Icon." Myrtle Beach.com. City of Myrtle Beach, September 24, 2016. https://www.myrtlebeach.com/pavilion/?utm_source=GeniusMonkey_VT

"Proposed carnival won't seek permit for downtown spot." WMBF Online. WMBF, April 19, 2013. https://www.wmbfnews.com/story/22026949/mb-city-council-opposes-new-attraction/

Image Sources(Click to expand)

Hardee, Lesta. McDonald, Janice. Images Of America: The Myrtle Beach Pavilion. Charleston, SC: Arcadia Publishing, 2010.

Hardee, Lesta. McDonald, Janice. Images Of America: The Myrtle Beach Pavilion. Charleston, SC: Arcadia Publishing, 2010.

Hardee, Lesta. McDonald, Janice. Images Of America: The Myrtle Beach Pavilion. Charleston, SC: Arcadia Publishing, 2010.