Clio Logo

Fort Detrick is currently a US Army medical base that is found in Frederick, Maryland. The area is a made up of 1,200 acres that used to be an airport known as Detrick Field. From 1931 to 1943 Detrick Field served as a small airport for the city of Frederick. Detrick Field then became Camp Detrick in the mid 40’s and was named after Major Frederick L. Detrick who was a World War 1 veteran. Camp Detrick didn’t become Fort Detrick until 1956 when it became one of the most advanced specialty contaminant locations. Fort Detrick now is a major center for biomedical research and has communications for several Washington DC based governmental departments.


Camp Detrick was training area for pilots in the 104th Aero Squadron which was a part of the Maryland National Guard. Detrick Field at Camp Detrick was used as a training facility for cadets and other units to prepare for their time overseas in World War 2.  The US Army’s 2nd Bombardment Squadron was held for several months in Camp Detrick in 1942 after they were deployed to England during World War 2.

 

In 1956 Camp Detrick was changed into its current standing at Fort Detrick.  Since 1956 Fort Detrick has made biomedical research the main task while also holding the title as the world’s most advanced research facility for agents that require a special contaminant.  Another main usage of Fort Detrick was for the research of offensive biological weapons, but this program was shut down in 1969. 

 

Currently, Fort Detrick is best known for their biomedical research as well as their many other advanced laboratories.  In 1971, the Frederick National Laboratory was created which holds laboratories for the Department of Health and Human services and labs for cancer research.  With Fort Detrick lying directly in the middle of the city of Frederick, it plays a major role in the community by providing thousands of jobs for military members as well as civilians. 

 

History of Fort Detrick. DCMilitary. June 10, 2015. Accessed April 11, 2019. https://www.dcmilitary.com/standard/news/history-of-fort-detrick/article_302b3573-72e9-53de-93b1-8ae5d124ae4d.html.