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Near this road was the location of Dr. Pierson's home. During his time with the Jacksonville UGRR, he lived at the former Turman Place's home located about a mile west of town, later it became Fair View, Dr. J. Pitner's home. Being a member of the Presbyterian church, he had ties to the Congressional Church members as a fellow abolitionist.


  • Undated photo of Azle Pierson.

Being  a member of the Presbyterian church, he had ties to the Congressional Church members as a fellow abolitionist. One of Pierson’s involvement took place after 1853 when he hid 3 women who were at first brought to his house and later  moved to a second station, Kirby's home. After a ten day stay, Henderson moved them to (Dr. John) Lyman's place in Pleasant Plains [Farmington]. The women were being chased by officials from Jacksonville, under the Fugitive Slave law. Pierson was also involved with Joseph Tuner's only recorded incident with runaways that took place in December of 1846. Irving came to Turner for help with three runaways that escaped from the St. Louis' slave market. The three were hiding in an old cabin southwest of where Benjamin Henderson lived. Turner, with a hickory stick in hand went to get the three women, who had have been living outdoors for about a week. Turner took the three to Dr. Pierson, to ask if he could help the fugitives. The good doctor took them in and fed and nursed the three for one to two weeks before someone else took them to Canada.  

A record search did not indicate a year that Pierson came to Jacksonville. But  records search indicates that by the 1850’s he moved  to Schuyler County, Illinois to farm and later in life settled in Augusta, Hancock County, Illinois where he died.

Charles Eames, Historic Morgan and Classic Jacksonville (Jacksonville: The Daily Journal Steam Job Printing Office, 1885)