Drake Well Museum and Park was the site where Edwin L. Drake stuck oil for the first time in Titusville, Pennsylvania on August 27, 1859. The Drake Well is located along Oil Creek in the northwestern part of Pennsylvania. The museum preserves and shares the history of the site, and its role in giving birth to the modern petroleum industry.


  • The Drake Well Museum interprets and shares the history of the birthplace of the petroleum industry.
    The Drake Well Museum interprets and shares the history of the birthplace of the petroleum industry.
  • The museum produced this brochure which offers an introduction to the museum and the history of the site.
    The museum produced this brochure which offers an introduction to the museum and the history of the site.

Edwin L. Drake's striking of oil helped modernize the petroleum industry.  Oil boom towns started developing around new oil strikes throughout Pennsylvania. After the oil started to dwindle, the "oil fever" died off, and the oil boom towns faded away just as fast as they come. Today you can still see the oil industries remands scattered alongside creeks and up in the wooded hillsides of Pennsylvania. 

Drake Well Museum was completed in 1963. The museum offers exhibits, demonstrations, and videos.  It also features special events and provides educational programs of the oil industries. The events shown at the museum help tell the stories of Pennsylvania history dealing with oil from the early Native American civilizations to the present day. 

The Drake Well Museum displays artifacts and documents that were collected thirty years after Edwin L Drake's death in 1880. The other artifacts on display at the museum where donated by succeeding generations. All these artifacts and donations help to explain the oil industries revolution in the early years. The museum also showcases working oil field machinery along with reconstructed historical buildings that were places along Oil Creek from the original oil drilling site. With the help of the machinery, the buildings, documents and artifacts left behind, we can better understand the technology use by the early oil industrial heritage.