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The Lewis and Clark Expedition, in its movement across the North American Continent, finalized its trek to the Pacific Ocean across what is now the State of Washington. In anticipation of the bicentennial of the expedition, the Washington State Society Daughters of the American Revolution marked four Lewis and Clark Expedition campsites across Washington State with stones engraved with original diary excerpts of the expedition. The front of the marker displays the NSDAR insignia, the Lewis & Clark Corps of Discovery logo and the words “Lewis and Clark Trail” highlighted in gold leaf. The back of the marker quotes William Clark in his journal: October 16, 1805 - William Clark recorded in his journal that on this date: "...After getting safely over the rapid and having taken diner set out and proceeded on seven miles to the junction of this river and the Columbia which joins from the N.W. The words "this river" refer to the Snake River, which flows into the Columbia about one mile to the southwest of this marker. Marker placed by Washington State Society Daughters of the American Revolution June 8, 2000.


  • NSDAR insignia, the Lewis & Clark Corps of Discovery logo and the words “Lewis and Clark Trail” highlighted in gold leaf.
  • Excerpt: October 16, 1805 "...After getting safely over the rapid and having taken diner set out and proceeded on seven miles to the junction of this river and the Columbia which joins from the N.W."

This historical marker is in Hood Park, an Army Corps of Engineers Park, in Walla Walla County near Burbank, Washington. This marker is tucked between the Snake River, Highways 12 and 124, both highways official Lewis and Clark Trail highways. It is inside the park in a picnic area near a utility building, and to the right of a parking lot. It is 42" high and made of Lake Superior green granite.

The Washington State DAR received a $10,000 grant from the National Park Service, under the direction of Richard Williams for markers and the Tresko Monument company of Spokane contracted to make the markers. According to WSSDAR State Historian Leota King, the states of Kansas, Missouri, Montana, and Washington used the same stone and design to bring conformity to the Trail. 

Excerpt from: Lewis & Clark Trail Heritage Foundation WA Chapter Newsletter, August 2000 edition: On June 8, 2000, the Washington State Society, Daughters of the American Revolution, dedicated their third Lewis and Clark trail marker. Master of Ceremonies for the event was new State Regent, Barbara Herbst-Anderson. Shirley Wagers, under whose Regency this project was started and who is now a Vice President General of the National Society, DAR, gave the dedicatory address. Sgt. Patrick Gass of the Corps of Discovery was expected to attend, but his canoe must have swamped on the way up the river because he didn't arrive. He has been a long-time house guest of Gary Lentz, manager of the Lewis and Clark Trail State Park near Dayton. By Leota L. King


 

Stenstrom, Della. Stirling, Shirley. Historical Marker Review 1894-2016 Washington State Society NSDAR. Union Gap, WA. WSSDAR, 2016. 

https://lewisandclarkjournals.unl.edu/journals/contents. University of Nebraska Press