Clio Logo

Original site of the Admission Day Monument, also known as the Native Sons Monument and the Phelan Fountain. Erected in 1897 to celebrate California statehood. It was moved to Golden Gate Park in 1948. But lobbying from the Native Sons led to it being moved again to Market, Post & Montgomery streets in 1977.


  • [Native Sons Statue being moved from Market, Turk and Mason streets to Golden Gate park]. December 29, 1948. Photo ID #AAA-9489. SAN FRANCISCO HISTORY CENTER, SAN FRANCISCO PUBLIC LIBRARY.
  • [Native Sons Monument at the intersection of Turk, Mason and Market streets]. 1906. Photo ID #AAC-4064. SAN FRANCISCO HISTORY CENTER, SAN FRANCISCO PUBLIC LIBRARY.

The Admission Day Monument was commissioned by San Francisco Mayor James D. Phelan for $12,000. Like the Mechanics Monument located nearby, it was sculpted by Californian Douglas Tilden. It was unveiled on California Admission Day (September 9) in 1897. 

The monument stood at the intersection of Mason, Turk and Market Streets, near the Native Sons of the Golden West in San Francisco’s Tenderloin District, from 1897-1948. It was moved from that location to expedite traffic in 1948. It was relocated to Golden Gate Park, home of many other public monuments. But lobbying from the Native Sons moved it back to the Tenderloin District at Market, Post & Montgomery streets in 1977.

LaBounty, Woody. Admission Day: A Closer Look. OpenSFHistory.  Accessed June 12, 2018. http://opensfhistory.org/news/2017/09/04/admission-day-a-closer-look/.

[Native Sons Statue being moved from Market, Turk and Mason streets in order for police to expedite traffic in area]. San Francisco History Center, San Francisco Public Library. Photo ID # AAX-0098. http://sflib1.sfpl.org:82/record=b1004560