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The Sanders Corps of Cadets Center serves as Texas A&M University’s military history museum. It is where the history of Texas Aggies who have dedicated their service to the nation is located. The museum documents all relevant information from the university’s history with the Corps of Cadets and officer training for the United States Military and civilian leaders for today.


  • This is the main view of the Sanders Corps of Cadets Center.
  • The Corps of Cadets Center was erected in 1990.

Texas A&M University has produced military leaders for times of war. Today, the University's ROTC program has evolved but continues to train Aggies in service to the nation as military officers and civilian leaders. [1] Texas A&M built a museum in 1992 to record the history of the university's continuing dedication to nurturing leadership and training for cadets and those who go on to serve. The Sam Houston Sanders Corps of Cadets Center serves Texas A&M University as the museum that preserves the Aggies’ military history and traditions.

Texas A&M University’s Corps of Cadets Center was named after Dr. Sam Houston Sanders Jr. who “was named Distinguished Alumnus of the medical school.”[2] Sanders was a successful leader who expressed his generosity and gratitude for being an Aggie. Sanders said that “Texas A&M made me what I am today” due to the university’s supplemental academic and leadership training since participation in the Corps of Cadets was mandatory before 1965.[3] Sanders was a football athlete. He also majored in medicine and he served in the Corps of Cadets. Texas A&M had molded him into a successful leader when he founded the Mid-South Football Officials Association and the Head of the Department of Otolaryngology and Maxillofacial Surgery at the University of Tennessee College of Medicine.[4] Sanders had dedicated his career to the field of medicine until his passing when he became the principal donor for the establishment of the Sam Houston Sanders Corps of Cadets Center.[5] The Corps of Cadets Center today is Texas A&M’s welcoming place where visitors and current cadets can come to the facility to explore the history of Aggies’ military service.

Debates to construct a Corps of Cadets Center were considered when retired general and former commandant, Tom Darling encouraged that Texas A&M University should build the facility. The center was constructed to document the history of the military institution and Aggie traditions since its establishment.[6] The facility today is “a combination visitor center and museum” that “provides a daily link with heritage of the Corps as well as a base for recruiting and tutoring programs.”[7] The Center’s creation was possible due to substantial donations from former students to document the military lifestyle in the Corps of Cadets to include "displays on Final Review, the Ross Volunteer Company, the Aggie Band and Parson's Mounted Cavalry."[8] This also "presents the history of traditions, such as Muster, the 12th Man, Silver Taps and Reveille."[9]  The Sanders Corps of Cadets Center today serves as the institution’s military and Corps’ history museum that documents the past and inspires future Aggies. 

Exhibits at Corps of Cadets Center were donated by A&M alumnus. They donated all kinds of artifacts visitors will find displayed in the Great Hall and Antique Firearm Collection room where soldier’s weapons from the 18th century to present day, including the facility’s library containing volumes of military history and other books on warfare. One of its primary goals is to “preserve and present the history and traditions of the Corps of Cadets and to recognize the accomplishments of present and former members.”[10] Other functions of the museum include a visitor’s center for former cadets and families to explore the history of significant military artifacts and the university's accomplishments of inspiring the heroism of Texas A&M's eight Medal of Honor recipients who selflessly dedicated their service to their country. The majority of these soldiers’ medals are displayed inside the Great Hall that provides each citation and other military achievements they were awarded to include the notable Military Order of the Purple Heart. The tales of these eight Medal of Honor recipients continues to teach patriotism for today’s Aggies that will inspire them to accomplish extraordinary goals.

The accomplishments of Texas A&M University's Corps of Cadets are limitless not only documenting the eight Medal of Honor recipients but also the recognition of commissioning military leaders who became flag and higher-ranking officers. This includes the university’s most recent graduates in service to include the current United States Air Force Vice Chief of Staff, General Wilson and Texas A&M’s Commandant of Cadets, Brigadier General Ramirez.

Military service was vital when World War I and World War II began, and the United States needed soldiers for that. Aggies who served in the Corps of Cadets responded to the call of duty. As stated by Douglas McArthur, “Texas A&M is writing its own history in the blood of its graduates.”[11] The Sam Houston Sanders Corps of Cadets Center was an idea to document the Aggies’ military traditions into exhibits and history to life. The museum remains here to invite visitors and alumni to recognize the contribution of loyal Aggies. The Corps of Cadets Center at Texas A&M University also inspires current students to become leaders and follow in the footsteps of these exemplary leaders.

[1] ROTC is Reserve Officer Training Corps where students can earn a military commission after college graduation and serve in the Armed Forces as an officer.

[2] "A&M Graduate Receives Another Honor,” The Eagle, January 14, 1984.

[3] "Dr. Sam Houston Sanders '22," Texas A&M University Corps of Cadets.

[4] Ibid.

[5] Ibid.

[6] “At the Corps of History,” The Eagle, September, 21, 2002.

[7] John A. Adams Jr., Keepers of the Spirit: The Corps of Cadets at Texas A&M University (College Station: Texas A&M University Press, 2001), 272.

[8] “Center Chronicles History of University, Corps of Cadets,” The Battalion, October 31, 1997.

[9] Ibid.

[10] “We’ll Meet Under the Arches,” Sam Houston Sanders Corps of Cadets Center Grand Opening Program, September 12, 1992.

[11] Adams, Keepers of the Spirit: The Corps of Cadets at Texas A&M University, 135.

Bibliography

“A&M Graduate Receives Another Honor,” The Eagle, January 14, 1984.

“At the Corps of History,” The Eagle, September, 21, 2002.   

“Center Chronicles History of University, Corps of Cadets,” The Battalion, October 31, 1997.  

“Dr. Sam Houston Sanders '22.” Texas A&M University Corps of Cadets. Accessed March 04,

2018. https://corps.tamu.edu/portfolio-items/sam-sanders/.

Adams, John A., Keepers of the Spirit: The Corps of Cadets at Texas A&M University, 1876-

2001. College Station: Texas A&M University Press, 2011.

“We’ll Meet Under the Arches,” Sam Houston Sanders Corps of Cadets Center Grand Opening

Program, September 12, 1992.

 

 

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