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St. Joseph's Cemetery - Waterbury's first Catholic Cemetery - was consecrated in 1858, one year after the establishment of Waterbury's first Catholic parish. For the 25-30 years prior to this, Waterbury Catholics were associated with St. Mary's Church in New Haven, and their dead were buried in its associated cemetery, some 25 miles away. Despite its name, St. Joseph's is still active; it is has been called "old" since the opening of New St. Joseph's Cemetery .5 mile south on Hamilton Avenue.


  • Cemetery, Tree, Grave, Headstone

St. Joseph's Cemetery - Waterbury's first Catholic Cemetery - was consecrated in 1858, one year after the establishment of Waterbury's first Catholic parish. For the 25-30 years prior to this, Waterbury Catholics were associated with St. Mary's Church in New Haven, and their dead were buried in its associated cemetery, some 25 miles away. By the end of the 19th century Waterbury had six Catholic parishes, and half the city's population was Catholic.

Despite its name, St. Joseph's is still active; it is has been called "old" since the opening of New St. Joseph's Cemetery .5 mile south on Hamilton Avenue.

Naderson, Joseph. The Town and City of Waterbury Connecticut, from the Aboriginal Period to the Year Eighteen Hundred and Ninety-Five. Vol. III. New Haven, CT. The Price & Lee Company, 1896.

Image Sources(Click to expand)

https://images.findagrave.com/photos/2005/68/CEM46625834_111050605730.jpg