The inscription on the sign reads: One of the events which led up to Dunmore's War was the killing at this point of the family of Chief Logan, eloquent leader of the Mingo Indians, April, 1774, opposite their village at the mouth of Yellow Creek in Ohio. Logan was the son of Shikellamy, he was an oratator that was of the Cayuga nation. He was also a war leader, and he was well known for his speeches that he gave. He, like his father brought many people together.


  • Historical Marker that denotes what occurred at the Logan Massacre.
    Historical Marker that denotes what occurred at the Logan Massacre.

Logan was the son of Shikellamy, he was an oratator that was of the Cayuga nation. He was also a war leader, and he was well known for his speeches that he gave. He, like his father brought many people together. After going to what was deemed ohio country at that time, Logan joined the Mingo people, a tribe that was made up of the Seneca, Cayuga, Lenape and other remnant peoples. He took up revenge on those that killed his family. 


Logan became known for a speech, later known as Logan's Lament. This speech was debated by many scholars of whether or not it was actually his speech and words used. It is more than likely that it was, because he was known as such a valiant speaker by many. 
Other names that Logan was known by were Tahgahjute, Tachnechdorus, Soyechtowa, Tocanioadorogon, The Great Mingo,  James Logan, and John Logan. 

The Yellow Creek  Massacre was a massacre where Virginia Long Knives murdered a large amount of Mingo people. One of the people murdered was Logan's brother. For the fact that his family and close friends were murdered, he decided that he would get revenge on the Virginia Long Knives. 

What was known as Dunmore's war on one front, was Known as Logan's massacre on another front. This was a rightful retaliation, based off of the laws at that time among the indigenous peoples. Logan sought after those who killed his family and wanted to avenge their deaths. 

Logan — The Mingo Chief, 1710-1780, Ohio Archaeological and Historical Society Publications: Volume 20 [1911], pp. 137–175.

The Logan Elm: Logan, chief of the Mingoes