This marker commemorates the capture of Mexican President Antonio Lopez de Santa Anna on April 22, 1836, a day after the Battle of San Jacinto which resulted in a resounding Texan victory and ultimately the establishment of the Republic of Texas. The battle lasted a surprisingly short 18 minutes and it was a total defeat for the Mexicans who were caught in a surprise attack. Santa Anna managed to escape, disguising himself as a just a regular soldier. The Texan general, Sam Houston, ordered troops to search for escaping Mexican troops. The next day, a group of Texan soldiers found Santa Anna somewhere in this area (the exact location is unclear) although they did not know it was him at first. It was only when they brought Santa Anna back to the Texan camp that his identity was finally revealed. Mexican soldiers, upon seeing him, immediately declared "El Presidente!" and saluted him. He was taken to Sam Houston, who spared his life and allowed him to write an order to his armies to retreat back to Mexico. In the coming days the Treaty of Velasco was negotiated between Mexico and officials of the nascent Republic of Texas. Santa Anna was taken to Velasco to sign the treaty and was then sent back to Mexico.


  • The marker commemorating the capture of President Santa Anna on April 22, 1836.
    The marker commemorating the capture of President Santa Anna on April 22, 1836.

Upon returning to Mexico, Santa Anna was obviously not a popular figure. However, the political situation in Mexico for the next couple decades was quite fluid, allowing him to take advantage of the situation and become leader of Mexico again eleven times. He was overthrown for the last time in 1855. He died a penniless man in 1876 at the age of 82.

"The Capture of Santa Anna." The Historical Marker Database. Accessed July 24, 2017. https://www.hmdb.org/marker.asp?marker=60821,

"General Santa Anna dies in Mexico City." History.com. Accessed July 24, 2017. http://www.history.com/this-day-in-history/general-santa-anna-dies-in-mexico-city.

Sproat, Leslie. "Capture Site of Santa Anna." Sam Houston State University. Accessed July 24, 2017. http://easttexashistory.org/items/show/142.

"Surrender Of Santa Anna." Texas State Library and Archives Commission. Accessed July 24, 2017. [This is a personal account given under oath about the surrender of Santa Anna by Texan soldier John Forbes] https://www.tsl.texas.gov/treasures/republic/san-jacinto/surrender.html.

Photo: Jim Evans, via the Historical Marker Database