The Devil's Slide Bunker was a military observation station used during World War II to defend the harbor of San Fransisco. Military personnel inside the bunker would use binoculars and compasses to scout for enemy ships. If the military personnel would discover enemy ships, they would then send the coordinates of the enemy vessel to a central command post. Other observation stations in the area would then do the same, thus allowing the central command post to triangulate a ship's exact location.


  • The Devil's Slide Bunker was used during WWII to keep an eye out for enemy vessels.
    The Devil's Slide Bunker was used during WWII to keep an eye out for enemy vessels.
  • No trail leads up to the bunker but is rather easily accessible.
    No trail leads up to the bunker but is rather easily accessible.

During the 1930s, just a few years before World War II, The United States Army began constructing a series of bunkers on Devil's Peak in San Fransisco, California. In 1941, the Japanese bombed the Pearl Harbor Navy Base in Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, thus causing the United States to enter World War II. Following the attack on Hawaii, the construction of the bunkers alongside Devil's Peak was quickly finished.

Military personnel inside the bunker would use binoculars and compasses to scout for enemy ships. If the military personnel would discover enemy ships, they would then send the coordinates of the enemy vessel to a central command post. Other observation stations in the area would then do the same, thus allowing the central command post to triangulate a ship's exact location.

According to Slate.com, the Bunkers were abandoned in 1949 after the invention and implementation of modern missile defense systems. Sometime after that, the property was purchased by a private owner. Despite the bunker being on private property, curious minds still brave the dangerous terrain to get a closer look at the Devil's Slide Bunker. According to KRON News, there is no hiking trail that allows access to the abandoned bunker. Visitors must walk alongside the road, where there are posted "no parking signs," and walk alongside the road, right past the "no pedestrians" sign. Despite these warnings, there are no posted signs that say no trespassing on the actual property where the Devil's Slide Bunker sits. 

Grundhauser, Eric. "The Devil’s Slide Bunker Teeters on the Edge." June 18, 2015. Accessed April 20, 2017. http://www.slate.com/blogs/atlas_obscura/2015/06/18/california_s_abandoned_devil_s_slide_bunker_look....

Devil's Slide Bunker. Atlas Obscura. Accessed April 20, 2017. http://www.atlasobscura.com/places/devil-s-slide-bunker.

Kinney, Aaron. "Devils Slide military bunker: That strange building off Highway 1." Mercury News. November 23, 2015. Accessed April 20, 2017. http://www.mercurynews.com/2015/11/23/devils-slide-military-bunker-a-ghostly-reminder-of-world-war-i....