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The Mount Torry Furnace was an iron furnace constructed in 1804 by Robert Long. While it was a cold-blast furnace at first, it was converted to hot-blast in 1853. Though it was retired in 1855, it was reopened to produce iron for the Confederacy during the Civil War. In 1864, the furnace was destroyed by Brigadier General Alfred Duffie, though it was rebuilt the following year. The Mount Torry Furnace operated until 1884, when it was closed permanently. It was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1974.


  • Mount Torry Furnace
  • Mount Torry Furnace Sign
The Mount Torry Furnace was constructed in 1804 on the orders of Robert Long. Iron produced at Mount Torry was ferried down the James River to Richmond. Originally, the furnace was configured for cold-blast, though it was converted in 1853 after it was discovered that hot-blast was superior. The furnace's first retirement would be in 1855 due to competition with Northern production facilities.

It was refired in 1863 when a representative of the Tredegar Iron Works of Richmond requested that they aid the Confederacy. In 1864, the furnace was destroyed by Brigadier General Alfred N. Duffie as part of an assault on Mount Torry, though it would be rebuilt the next year and continue production. Its final retirement would be in 1884.

The Mount Torry Iron Furnace is a notable example of early United States iron production, radically different from the steel mills of the turn of the 20th century. It was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1974.
National Register of Historic Places Nomination Form. Virginia Department of Historic Resources. http://www.dhr.Virginia.gov/registers/Counties/Augusta/007-0871_Mount_Torry_Furnace_1974_Final_Nomination.pdf.

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