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The Folly Plantation House was built in 1818 on land owned by Joseph Smith, a member of the Virginia House of Delegates. At the time, the plantation primarily produced wheat. Following Smith's death in 1863, the property has remained in the possession of his descendants to this day and remains in operation, though it no longer grows wheat. It was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1973.


  • Folly Plantation House

The Folly Plantation house was built on land owned by Joseph Smith (1783-1863), a member of the Virginia House of Delegates, and completed in 1818. As the house bears a resemblance to Thomas Jefferson's version of the Palladian style, it is suspected, but not confirmed, that Smith was an associate of the third President, though the former did not have a hand in constructing the house.

Folly is a one story structure constructed in the Jeffersonian style, similarly to the buildings the former President was responsible for designing at the University of Virginia. The house also bears a resemblance to another nearby home, Edgemont, which has lead to speculation that Smith was an associate of Colonel James Cocke. Following the loss of the distinctive serpentine walls at the University of Virginia, Folly remains as the only example of them in Virginia.

After Smith's death in 1863, the house was passed down to his descendants. It has remained in the family to this day and remains in operation, though it no longer produces its former primary crop. It was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1973.

National Register of Historic Places Nomination Form. Virginia Department of Historic Resources. http://www.dhr.Virginia.gov/registers/Counties/Augusta/007-0015_Folly_1973_Final_Nomination.pdf.