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The Original Founding Church of Scientology, also known as the L. Ron Hubbard House, is located in Washington, D.C., a few blocks away from the new Founding Church of Scientology. Built in 1904, it served as the residence of the founder of Scientology from 1955 to 1959. The house was restored to its 1957 appearance in 2006 and opened in 2007 as a writer's museum. It contains a recreation of the Hubbard Communications Office and literature describing Hubbard's early life.


  • Exterior view of the L. Ron Hubbard House. Image by AgnosticPreachersKid - Own work, CC BY-SA 3.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=10504372
  • L. Ron Hubbard in 1950

The Original Founding Church of Scientology is located in Washington, D.C. and is part of the Dupont Circle Historic District (listed on the National Register of Historic Places). Designed by the local architectural firm Wood, Donn, & Deming, the structure was built in 1904 in the Mediterranean Revival style. It is three storys in height, with an exterior of cream-colored brick accented with wood and stone trim. It also features a two-story bay window, red-tiled roof, and a Flemish gable. Originally designed for Arvine W. Johnston, it has since been owned by notable individuals such as United States Senators James K. Jones and Claude A. Swanson.

This building also once served as the residence of L. Ron Hubbard, the founder of the Church of Scientology. He purchased the home in 1955, the same year he organized the Founding Church. It met at this location until 1959. Since then, it has housed several Scientology organizations, such as the site of the Academy of Scientology (during which it was known as The Academy of Religious Arts and Sciences), and the National Academy of American Psychology (NAAP).

While under the ownership of Hubbard, this building was the site of numerous important developments in the organization's history. From his office on the second floor, the Executive Director oversaw church organization, penned administrative articles and policies, and made important announcements. Additionally, it was from this location that one of the first Scientology Distribution Centers distributed Hubbard's works worldwide.

The Founding Church sold the property in the mid-1970s, and it returned to residential use until the Friends of L. Ron Hubbard repurchased it in 2004. The home later underwent an extensive, year-long renovation during which it was restored to its 1957 appearance. In 2007, the L. Ron Hubbard House opened as a writer's museum. Inside is a recreation of the Hubbard Communications Office. The museum attempts to tell the story of the Church's founding through artifacts, informative displays, photo galleries, and literature.

"The Historic Founding Church of Scientology." Church of Scientology International. Accessed September 25, 2016. http://www.scientology-washingtondc.org/inside-our-church/historic-founding-church-of-scientology.html. "L. Ron Hubbard House." Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia. Accessed September 25, 2016. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/L._Ron_Hubbard_House. "Original Founding Church of Scientology." Church of Scientology International. Accessed September 25, 2016. http://www.lronhubbard.org/heritage-sites/dc.html. "Tour | Founding Church of Scientology." Church of Scientology International. Accessed September 25, 2016. http://www.scientology-washingtondc.org/inside-our-church.html. Atack, Jon. A Piece of Blue Sky: Scientology, Dianetics, and L. Ron Hubbard exposed. Carol Publishing Group, 1990 Christensen, Dorthe Refslund. "Inventing L. Ron Hubbard: On the Construction and Maintenance of the Hagiographic Mythology of Scientology's Founder," pp. 227–258 in Lewis, James R.; Petersen, Jesper Aagaard: Controversial new religions. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2005.