Farley's Fort was a large log structure built by Thomas Farley between 1775 and 1776 to defend settlers against attacks by the Indians. Its location was near the New River above Bull Falls, and below Tom's Run in Culbertson's Bottom (now called Crump's Bottom) in present day Summers County West Virginia upstream from Hinton, West Virginia.


  • New River at Crump's Bottom in area where Farley's Fort might have been.
    New River at Crump's Bottom in area where Farley's Fort might have been.
  • Crump's Bottom in area where Farley's Fort might have been.
    Crump's Bottom in area where Farley's Fort might have been.
  • Tom's Run looking upstream.
    Tom's Run looking upstream.
  • Historical marker of Thomas Farley at the Farley Wayside in Giles County Virginia.
    Historical marker of Thomas Farley at the Farley Wayside in Giles County Virginia.
  • Another picture of Thomas Farley historical marker at the Farley Wayside in Giles County Virginia.
    Another picture of Thomas Farley historical marker at the Farley Wayside in Giles County Virginia.

Farley's Fort was a large log structure built by Thomas Farley between 1775 and 1776 to defend settlers against attack by the Indians. Farley's Fort was said to be built on a spot above Bull Falls around Warford and River Ridge on the south side of the New River below Tom's Run. Warford was the name for a ford across the New River used by Indian warriors. Farley's Fort was located in Culbertson's Bottom, which is now called Crump's Bottom in present day Summers County West Virginia upstream from Hinton, West Virginia.

There is a historical marker to Thomas Farley on Route 100 south of Pearisburg, Virginia in Giles County at the Farley Wayside beside Walker Creek.  The historical marker was erected in 1944 by the George Pearis Chapter of the Daughters of the American Revolution and the Nathaniel Green Chapter of the Sons of the American Revolution.

James Caldwell, in his Revolutionary War Pension Declaration, stated that Farley's (Farlow's) Fort on Culbertson's Bottom was burned by the Indians in the spring of 1778 (Dorman 1968:47). Caldwell stated that during this time he had served under the command of Captain Archibald Woods and they had spent fifteen days pursuing the hostile Indians who burned the fort.  HISTORIC SITES IN CRUMPS BOTTOM, BLUESTONE RESERVATION Robert F. Maslowski and Jodi L. Woody  https://www.nps.gov/parkhistory/online_books/symposia/newriver-84/sec16.htm

Today's Ohio River system was then the Western frontier. These were not only Indian lands, but were also a major route of travel for Native Americans. The Virginia frontier fort system was authorized by the Virginia Assembly in March of 1756 to help protect the settlers that increasingly encroached upon and settled these Indian lands. These forts were important in the protection of the settlers in the Western frontier from Indian attack.

Today there are no signs of Farley's Fort, and its location is not exactly known. It is very possible that its location is underwater as the area is now part of Bluestone Lake.  Below is a description of the archaeological assignment of Farley's Fort.

Ralph S. Solecki assigned site number 46SU19 to an area of Crump's Bottom opposite the mouth of Buffalo Creek, one mile east of Warford, which he thought may have been the location of Farley's Fort. Again European artifacts were collected but no test excavations were undertaken.  HISTORIC SITES IN CRUMPS BOTTOM, BLUESTONE RESERVATION Robert F. Maslowski and Jodi L. Woody  https://www.nps.gov/parkhistory/online_books/symposia/newriver-84/sec16.htm

HISTORIC SITES IN CRUMPS BOTTOM, BLUESTONE RESERVATION Robert F. Maslowski and Jodi L. Woody https://www.nps.gov/parkhistory/online_books/symposia/newriver-84/sec16.htm