The American Cowboy Museum serves the community by preserving and interpreting the art, history, and culture of the contributions of African Americans, Hispanic, Native Americans, and Women to the development of the American West through engaging exhibitions, educational programs, and public events reflective of the Texas region’s rich traditions and shared heritage. The founder, Mollie Taylor-Stevenson, Jr. and her mother were the first living African Americans inducted into the National Cowgirl Museum and Hall of Fame in Ft. Worth, Texas. In 1988, Mollie Stevenson, Sr., and Mollie Stevenson, Jr. founded and continue to operate the museum in the effort to preserve the multicultural history of the West. The museum, which is housed in an area of the Taylor-Stevenson Ranch, offers tours, exhibits, oral historians who offer stories and lectures dressed in native attire and hands-on activities. (Please note the at the museum's website as of July 2016 is not working)


  • The American Cowboy Museum is also part of a fully functioning, working ranch that showcases ranch equipment, such as tractors, plows, cultivators and planters.
    The American Cowboy Museum is also part of a fully functioning, working ranch that showcases ranch equipment, such as tractors, plows, cultivators and planters.

The museum is located on the 640-acre Taylor-Stevenson Ranch, the only African-American owned ranch in Texas to be officially recognized with the “century” designation. A “century ranch” is one that has been continuously owned by the same family for 100 years.

Holley, Joe. "Historic ranch lies in Houston's shadow." Houston Chronicle. June 29, 2013. http://www.houstonchronicle.com/local/native-texan/article/Historic-ranch-lies-in-Houston-s-shadow-4638390.php.