As one would expect, the George Jones Museum is dedicated to the life and music of what some consider to be country music’s greatest singer/song writer. The museum is located within the larger George Jones Entertainment Complex that also features a gift shop, Choices restaurant and bar, and The George, a rooftop lounge complete with live music and stunning views. The museum, which opened in April of 2015, contains numerous artifacts saved over the years by Jones’ widow, Nancy.


  • Street entrance to the George Jones Museum.
    Street entrance to the George Jones Museum.
  • A statue of "the Possum" within his museum.
    A statue of "the Possum" within his museum.
  • Jones' numerous awards and gold records on display.
    Jones' numerous awards and gold records on display.
  • The John Deere lawn mower similar to the one driven by Jones in search of liquor.
    The John Deere lawn mower similar to the one driven by Jones in search of liquor.

Jones, born in 1931, was given his first guitar at the age of nine and he took it from there.  He amassed thirteen number one country hits, to include “White Lightnin,” “She Thinks I Still Care,” and the international favorite, “He Stopped Loving Her Today.”  Jones also was known for the numerous duets that he recorded with such artists as Loretta Lynn, Waylon Jennings and B. B. King.  He died in 2013 and is buried in Nashville.

Located in a renovated, four-story building, the museum details Jones’ life from beginning to end, and it focuses on his endearing qualities as well as his flaws.  Jones suffered through an addiction to alcohol for much of his adult life and the museum does not gloss over this tragic aspect of his life.  It details his numerous marriages and subsequent divorces as well.

However, the museum is first and foremost a celebration of the music of George Jones and its influence on the industry to this day.  Yes, there is a John Deere riding lawn mower present in the museum, but it’s not THE lawn mower he once drove eight miles in search of liquor, just a similar one he owned.  At the museum, one can listen to his music and also view some of his live performances.  On display are his many gold records, awards, the leather jacket he was wearing during a near-fatal auto accident, his favorite bowling ball and shoes, belt buckles, autographed footballs and many pairs of cowboy boots in a myriad of colors.