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The Howland Stone Store Museum was built in 1837 by entrepreneur, abolitionist, and suffragist Slocum Howland. Its cobblestone construction was popular in New York at the time and is an excellent example of this style. The building was placed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1994 for both its architecture and association with the abolitionist and suffragist movements. Howland, his daughter, and niece were very active in these movements. The museum features artifacts related to the sale of local products and the importation and exportation of goods, items, and memorabilia related to the abolitionist and suffragist movements, and numerous artifacts the family collected on their travels abroad. A highlight of the collection is an Underground Railroad pass brought by two escaping slaves who sought refuge with Howland. The town itself was recently placed on the National Register (as the Sherwood Equal Rights Historic District) because of its strong support for the abolition and suffrage.


  • The Howland Stone Store Museum is listed the National Register of Historic Places for both its architecture and association with the abolitionist and suffragist movements.

Howland's daughter, Emily, was a prominent, nationally recognized  abolitionist and suffragist. She founded around 40 schools for emancipated blacks, including in Sherwood, and taught in some of them as well. Among her many activities, she was a major financier for suffragist activities in New York and elsewhere, worked closely (and became friends) with Susan B. Anthony, spoke before Congress, had tea with Queen Victoria, and gave numerous lectures. 

Homepage. Howland Stone Store Museum. Accessed September 29, 2015.  http://www.howlandstonestore.org/#history.

Todd, Nancy L. "Howland Cobblestone Store." National Park Service - National Register of Historic Places Nomination Form. February 29, 2008.  https://s3.amazonaws.com/NARAprodstorage/lz/electronic-records/rg-079/NPS_NY/08000096.pdf.

Photo: Wikimedia Commons