Once the home of Dr. Anson Jones, the last president of the Republic of Texas, the Barrington Living History Farm preserves the 1850s way of life. A part of the Washington-on-the-Brazos, the Barrington Living History Farm is a fully operating cotton farm where interpreters perform the farm chores as they would have been when it belonged to the Jones family.


  • Barrington Living History Farm (texas_girl99, May 2014)
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    Barrington Living History Farm (texas_girl99, May 2014) http://www.tripadvisor.com/LocationPhotoDirectLink-g56848-d258504-i99829022-Washington_on_the_Brazos_State_Historic_Site-Washington_Texas.html#99101580

Anton Jones was a medical doctor who came to Texas in 1833. He owned his own practice in Brazoria. Dr. Anson also found himself involved in politics: he became a congressman, a minister to the United States, a senator, and finally the last president of the Republic of Texas before it became a part of the Union in 1845. 

After he was inaugurated as president, Dr.Jones and his wife Mary Smith McCrory purchased Barrington Farm, which Dr. Jones named after his hometown, Barrington, Massachusetts. The farm was called home by a large group of Jones family members and more: his wife, four children, his sister, his wife's four half-sisters, and multiple slaves. 

In 1857, the farm was sold, and Dr. Jones's death followed the next year.

The farmhouse is the original home belonging to the Jones family, which was built in 1844. In 1936, it was relocated from its original location to the Washington-on-the-Brazos State Historic Site for the Texas Centennial Celebration. The other buildings, which include a kitchen, smokehouse, chicken and duck coop, barn, and slave quarters, as well as the garden, corn and cotton crib, hog pen, and crops have all been replicated based on the accounts found in Dr. Jones's daybooks and other personal records. Visitors to the farm have the opportunity to interact with interpreters who wear period clothing and perform farm chores as they would have been during the 1850s. 

http://tpwd.texas.gov/publications/pwdpubs/media/pwd_br_p4505_0177.pdf