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Dating back to 1894, the One Hundred Members’ Debating Benevolent Association was one of the leading fraternal organization of the African American community. Founded by 12 members, the organization raised funds to support the families of members, as well as providing charity to community members and a place for lectures, debates, cultural activities, and entertainment. In 1922, the organization built this building as its headquarters. 100 Men D.B.A. Hall served as the center of African American social life in Bay St. Louis, and many events were sponsored by the association over the years. During the 1940s and 1950s, this hall was one of the premier venues for touring blues and jazz acts, with great musicians such as Etta James performing here. The venue is listed on the Mississippi Blues Trail and continues to host traveling musicians and other activities.


  • Built in 1922, this hall served as the center of black cultural life and continues to host live music.

Dating back to 1894, the One Hundred Members’ Debating Benevolent Association was one of the leading fraternal organization of the African American community. Founded by 12 members, the organization raised funds to support the families of members, as well as providing charity to community members and a place for lectures, debates, cultural activities, and entertainment. The Association's charter states its purpose was to "assist its members when sick and bury its dead in a respectable manner and to knit friendship" (other organizations' charters with the initials DBA generally stood for "Death and Burial Association"). Additionally, it seems that no record of the actual debates held by the Association still exists; as such, there is some confusion surrounding the origins of the association.

In 1922, the organization built this building as its headquarters. 100 Men D.B.A. Hall served as the center of African American social life in Bay St. Louis, and many events were sponsored by the association over the years. During the 1940s and 1950s, this hall was one of the premier venues for touring blues and jazz acts, with great musicians such as Etta James, Big Joe Turner, Guitar Slim, Irma Thomas, Professor Longhair, Ernie K-Doe, Deacon John, and Earl King performing here. The venue is listed on the Mississippi Blues Trail and continues to host traveling musicians and other activities. 

100 Men Hall, Mississippi Blues Trail. Accessed December 14th 2020. http://msbluestrail.org/blues-trail-markers/100-men-hall.