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Unveiled on May 10, 2010, this statue commemorates Boston Bruins Hall-of-Fame defenseman Bobby Orr (1948-) and one of the most iconic moments in NHL history. A revolutionary player who forever changed the role of defensemen, Orr is widely considered one of hockey’s greatest players. In ten seasons with the Bruins (1966-1976), he led the team to eight consecutive playoff berths and two Stanley Cups (1970 & 1972). Orr also racked up the individual accolades, winning the Norris Trophy (awarded to the league’s best defenseman) eight times, the Hart Trophy (given to the league’s most valuable player) three times, the Art Ross Trophy (presented to the NHL’s top scorer) twice, and the Calder Trophy (awarded to the league’s top rookie). In 1979, he was elected to the Hockey Hall of Fame. Fans of the Bruins, and of hockey in general, best remember Orr for his overtime goal in Game Four of the 1970 Stanley Cup Final against the St. Louis Blues, after which the stick of Blues defenseman Noel Picard tripped Orr and sent him flying through the air with his hands raised above his head in celebration. Known simply as “The Goal,” it broke a 3-3 tie, completed a four-game sweep of the Blues, and won the Bruins their first Stanley Cup since 1941. In recognition of the fortieth anniversary of “The Goal,” the Bruins unveiled a statue of Orr outside TD Garden. Designed by artist Harry Weber, the larger-than-life-sized bronze sculpture depicts the Bruins defenseman soaring through the air after scoring the Stanley Cup-winning goal. Originally installed just outside of TD Garden on Causeway Street, the statue now resides in The Hub on Causeway near the arena’s main entrance.


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Robert Gordon “Bobby” Orr was born the third of five children to Doug and Arva Orr on March 20, 1948 in the town of Parry Sound, Ontario. He came from a line of great athletes. His paternal grandfather played professional soccer in what is now Northern Ireland before immigrating to Canada in the early twentieth century. His father turned down an offer to play minor league hockey to serve in the Royal Canadian Navy during the Second World War. Orr started skating at the age of four and began playing organized hockey when he was five years old. Demonstrating incredible potential, he caught the attention of scouts from the Boston Bruins while playing in an amateur tournament in Ontario in the spring of 1961. The next year, Orr signed a junior amateur contract with the team. Over the next few years, he excelled in junior hockey despite playing with young men much older than him. 

Orr made his NHL debut for the Bruins in 1966, after signing the most lucrative rookie contract in league history at the time. He was an instant success, finishing second among the league’s defensemen in scoring and winning the Calder Trophy, awarded to the league’s top rookie. Over the next nine seasons, Orr led the Bruins to eight consecutive playoff berths and two Stanley Cups. He also racked up the individual awards. Orr won the Norris Trophy (awarded to the league’s best defenseman) eight times, and the Hart Trophy (given to the league’s most valuable player) three times. Most significantly, his offensive contributions forever redefined the role of defensemen in hockey and won him the Art Ross Trophy (presented to the NHL’s top scorer) twice. In 1976, after ten seasons with the Bruins, the organization traded him to the Chicago Blackhawks. Hobbled by knee problems that caused him excruciating pain, Orr played only sparingly during his years in Chicago. In November 1978, he announced his retirement. The following year, he was elected to the Hockey Hall of Fame. 

Fans of the Bruins, and of hockey in general, best remember Orr for his heroics in Game Four of the 1970 Stanley Cup Final. A mere forty seconds into the overtime period, he took a pass from below the goal line and smashed a one-timer past Blues goalie Glenn Hall. Immediately after, the stick of Blues defenseman Noel Picard tripped Orr, sending him flying through the air with his hands raised above his head in celebration. Known simply as “The Goal,” it broke a 3-3 tie, completed a four-game sweep of the Blues, and won the Bruins their first Stanley Cup since 1941. 

On the afternoon of May 10, 2010, in recognition of the fortieth anniversary of “The Goal,” the Bruins unveiled a statue of Orr outside TD Garden. Designed by artist Harry Weber, who ironically is a native of St. Louis, the larger-than-life-sized bronze sculpture depicts the Bruins defenseman soaring through the air after scoring the Stanley Cup-winning goal. Present at the dedication ceremony, in addition to Orr and Weber, were Bruins owner Jeremy Jacobs, TD Garden President John Wentzell, Boston Mayor Thomas Menino, members of the 1969-1970 team, and hundreds of fans. Originally installed just outside of TD Garden on Causeway Street, the statue now resides in The Hub on Causeway near the arena’s main entrance. 

"Bobby Orr." Encyclopædia Britannica. Web. 11 June 2021 <https://www.britannica.com/biography/Bobby-Orr>.

"Bobby Orr." hhof.com. Hockey Hall of Fame. Web. 11 June 2021 <https://www.hhof.com/LegendsOfHockey/jsp/LegendsMember.jsp?mem=p197902&type=Player&page=bio&list=ByName>.

McGourty, John. "Orr statue unveiled: in flight forever." nhl.com. 10 May 2010. Web. 11 June 2021 <https://www.nhl.com/news/orr-statue-unveiled-in-flight-forever/c-528686>.

Schwartz, Larry. "Orr brought more offense to defense." espn.com. Web. 11 June 2021 <http://www.espn.com/sportscentury/features/00016391.html>.

Stubbs, Dave. "Bobby Orr: 100 Greatest NHL Players." nhl.com. 1 January 2017. Web. 11 June 2021 <https://www.nhl.com/news/bobby-orr-100-greatest-nhl-hockey-players/c-285636896?tid=283865022>.

Image Sources(Click to expand)

https://pixels.com/featured/bobby-orr-statue-boston-joann-vitali.html

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Statue_of_Bobby_Orr

https://boston.cbslocal.com/2016/05/07/bobby-orr-bruins-td-garden-statue-moved/

https://www.nhl.com/bruins/news/photos--bobby-orr-through-the-years/c-316235366