This memorial is dedicated to American soldiers who became disabled for life during their service. The memorial was dedicated in October 2014, and stands as reminder of the four million men and women who have been seriously injured in the line of duty.


  • A ceremonial flame for those who fought with everything they had, but paid a heavy price
    A ceremonial flame for those who fought with everything they had, but paid a heavy price
  • Planning for the creation of the memorial began in 1997.
    Planning for the creation of the memorial began in 1997.
  • "The threading of voices, layered images and silhouettes, constantly shifting and changing with the light, capture a sense of memory and loss, struggle and strength."
    "The threading of voices, layered images and silhouettes, constantly shifting and changing with the light, capture a sense of memory and loss, struggle and strength."

 The center attraction a star shaped pool of water with a single flame in the middle of it that lights reminds of the past and pushes us forward to the future. "A single ceremonial flame floating on a star-shaped reflecting pool forms the centerpiece of the Memorial. As it attracts the eye, the still water subtly touches the heart, creating a profoundly moving experience.",avdlm,. This memorial not only took the vision of different types of artist that include: Iron sculptures, glass painters, to designers and landscapers. but also the creative genius of talent engineers to not only make water on fire but to make the smoke filtered away.
      In 1997 before these talented people got together to make this beautiful, captivating, serine place. Three people got together to discuss the problems of 
disabled veterans and there families. They were Lois Pope, a prominent philanthropist with a strong interest in veterans’ causes, Art Wilson, the National Adjutant of the Disabled. Who were brought together by Jesse Brown, who was the Secretary of Veterans Affairs in the Clinton Administration. Who along with two other volunteer staff members created the non profit organization of The Disabled Veterans’ Life Memorial Foundation, Inc. where they would spend months preparing for the rigorous process of getting a memorial placed within the United States Capital.  
      First to create the seamless look of the reflecting pool the water doesn't set still but actually is 
constantly moving from one side of the pool to another. which was designed flawless so when the water would circulate it would get filtered and cleaned before it was pushed out of the other side again. this kept the wind form making any part of the pool bare by blowing away the water and kept the water clean. The was contributed by the CEO of Technifex, the company that designed, engineered and fabricated the complex stainless steel framework and electronically controlled flame system. They installed many safety features in case of any emergency. 
   The hardest thing for the memorial to get ready for were the 48 stained glass paintings that held the excerpts from wounded veterans lives, called the Voice of the Veterans, with paintings that grab your attention. Each individual layer is 48x106 inches and weighs 360 pounds. The lamination of t the Memorial’s panels are strong enough to withstand hurricane-force winds without bending, breaking or leaning.

   Finally the almost life sized bronze  cut outs of wounded veterans that are throughout the memorial show just how hard it can be for not only the veterans but also for the families. This memorial isn't just one little thing, it is an experience that contains feelings and stories that can change your prescriptive. 


Washington.org website: http://washington.org/find-dc-listings/american-veterans-disabled-life-memorial American Veterans Disabled for Life Memorial website: http://www.avdlm.org/