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This is a contributing entry for Four Mile Historic Park and only appears as part of that tour.Learn More.

The Four Mile goat pen was expanded in 2019 to accommodate the arrival of Pearl the white Angora goat. Goats and sheep were useful additions to any pioneer farm, as they provided wool, meat, and milk. They also help control weeds, as they eat many different types of grass and plants.


  • Pearl in the Goat Pen
  • A Freshly Shorn Pearl on a walk in the Park
  • Coco
  • Edward

Four Mile’s current goats- Pearl, Cocoa, and Edward- are frequently shorn. Angora goats were first imported into the United States in 1849. It is unknown whether the Booths kept goats, but Four Mile has raised Angora goats for many years. Angoras grow very tick wool. Park volunteers often spin this wool into yarn. Pioneers would use the yarn they spun in items such as woven blankets and crocheted or knitted items. The yarn would often be dyed using natural dyes that were often made from plants like berries and beets.

Goat’s milk could be used for other purposes such as making cheese.

Pearl can often be seen on walks around the land with park volunteers. She even has her own instagram page- @Pearltheangoragoat. Visitors are discouraged from feeding the goats as well, as the goats tend to nibble fingers and clothing.

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Four Mile Historic Park Collections

Image Sources(Click to expand)

All Digital Photo Denver

All Digital Photo Denver

Four Mile Historic Park Collections

Four Mile Historic Park Collections