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Built in 1844, when Quincy granite was at the height of its popularity as a monumental architectural material. The residents of Quincy intended their Town Hall to be a testament to the quality of their granite industry. Solomon Willard, architect of the Bunker Hill Monument, designed the building and supervised its construction. Local artisans quarried, cut, transported the stone and constructed the building in a period—from conception to dedication—of five and one-half months. The building underwent extensive restoration in 2014-15. Quincy Town Hall is believed to be the nation’s second oldest continuous seat of municipal government.


Built in 1844, when Quincy granite was at the height of its popularity as a monumental architectural material. The residents of Quincy intended their Town Hall to be a testament to the quality of their granite industry. Solomon Willard, architect of the Bunker Hill Monument, designed the building and supervised its construction. Local artisans quarried, cut, transported the stone and constructed the building in a period—from conception to dedication—of five and one-half months. The building underwent extensive restoration in 2014-15. Quincy Town Hall is believed to be the nation’s second oldest continuous seat of municipal government.

Built in 1844, when Quincy granite was at the height of its popularity as a monumental architectural material. The residents of Quincy intended their Town Hall to be a testament to the quality of their granite industry. Solomon Willard, architect of the Bunker Hill Monument, designed the building and supervised its construction. Local artisans quarried, cut, transported the stone and constructed the building in a period—from conception to dedication—of five and one-half months. The building underwent extensive restoration in 2014-15. Quincy Town Hall is believed to be the nation’s second oldest continuous seat of municipal government.