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This is a contributing entry for Fort Hartsuff State Historical Park and only appears as part of that tour.Learn More.

During the 1870s, the U.S. Army had a policy of constructing its forts from whatever materials were available locally. With plenty of lime, sand, water, and gravel in the vicinity, this policy dictated concrete buildings at Fort Hartsuff. The Blacksmith/Carpenter’s Shop is a notable exception. It was built of board and batten construction with lumber cut by the fort’s own steam-powered sawmill.


  • Blacksmith/Carpenter Shop
  • Inside the Blacksmith/Carpenter Shop
  • Blacksmith/Carpenter Shop with Stables in the background

During the 1870s, the U.S. Army had a policy of constructing its forts from whatever materials were available locally. With plenty of lime, sand, water, and gravel in the vicinity, this policy dictated concrete buildings at Fort Hartsuff. The Blacksmith/Carpenter’s Shop is a notable exception. It was built of board and batten construction with lumber cut by the fort’s own steam-powered sawmill.

Within its walls, the blacksmith produced and repaired all manner of metal implements used by the soldiers, worked on the wagons and shod the horses and mules. Likewise, the carpenter was responsible for lumber in use here as well as the construction and repair of the fort itself. The carpenter was often called on to build the soldiers’ footlockers, which the soldier had to obtain for himself.

Domeier, Jim. The Guide to Fort Hartsuff (1874-1881), Accessed May 16th 2020.