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This home was built by R. Lowell Heminger in 1928 in the style of Colonial Revival. Heminger was a major figure in Findlay, having been a part of local newspapers for most of his life. He, along with his wife Golda, were very active in the community and have certainly left their mark on Findlay.


  • 214 Glendale Ave 2004
  • 214 Glendale Ave 2009
  • 214 Glendale Ave c1960s
  • 214 Glendale Ave 2009
  • Ed Heminger creating the Glendale Times

Russell Lowell Heminger was born on September 13, 1891 to Isaac Newton and Elizabeth (Burrell) Heminger. His family moved to Bluffton when he was only a few months old, where his father purchased a weekly newspaper called Bluffton News. The family eventually moved back to Findlay, where R. Lowell's father resumed working for the Morning Republican. In 1914, R. Lowell became a member of the Morning Republican staff. After serving in World War I, he returned to Findlay and became the associate editor at the Morning Republican. On June 10, 1918, Heminger married Golda McClelland. They had two sons, Harold H. and Edwin Lloyd Heminger.

With the merger of the Morning Republican and the evening Findlay Daily Courier, the newspaper became The Republican-Courier in 1933. R. Lowell became the president and general manager of the newspaper's owners the Findlay Publishing Company in 1914. Upon the passing of his father, he also served as the newspaper's editor. Under his leadership, the company expanded into radio broadcasting in 1949 when the radio station WFIN was purchased. In 1957, the the Columbus, Indiana station WCSI was also bought by the company.

In 1962, R. Lowell decided to step back from some of his duties after a heart attack, instead focusing on writing for the paper. He started the weekly column "Historical Highlights". He had such a love for his community that he wrote two books, "Profiles of Community Development and Progress" and "Across the Years in Findlay and Hancock County".

Golda also had a strong affinity for the community. She was very involved with the Camp Fire Girls. She, along with her sister Glenn Donnell, were chosen by the women' division of the Findlay Area Chamber of Commerce for Findlay's Women of the Year in 1952. On March 15, 1974, R. Lowell passed away. Golda succeeded him as chairman of the board of The Findlay Publishing Company. Golda passed on March 10, 1980.

Harold and Ed Heminger sold the house to Dr. William J. and Becky Kibbey on February 12, 1981. The Kibbeys then sold the home to Fred and Deborah Adams on July 24, 1992 for $225,000. The Adams sold to Karl L. and Anne M. Heminger on September 19, 2002. Karl is the grandson of R. Lowell and served as publisher of The Courier. Current owners, Kerry and Abby Trombley, purchased the home from Karl Heminger in 2016.

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Ed Heminger, R. Lowell's son, created his own small newspaper at ten years old. He sold to 125 subscribers for two cents per copy. He ran all aspects, from reporting to printing. He had a metal printing press in the basement of his home. He produced this paper for four years, and he eventually became the publisher of the Republican Courier in 1965. Ed said that he made $400 from this endeavor.

In 1952, Ed joined the Courier as assistant business manager and secretary of the Board fo Directors fo Findlay Publishing Company. He was elected vice-president in 1959 and named vice chairman of the board in 1977. IN 1983, he was elected president of the Findlay Publishing Company and chairman of the board in 1989.

Paul, Rosalinda, et al. Porches & Parlors: Findlay's Unique Historic Homes. Allegra Print & Imaging, 2009.

Image Sources(Click to expand)

Hancock Historical Museum Archives

Hancock Historical Museum Archives

Hancock Historical Museum Archives

Hancock Historical Museum Archives

Hancock Historical Museum Archives