Is this your first time here?

Each day, Clio connects thousands of people to nearby culture and history. Our website and mobile app are free for everyone and designed to make it easy to discover cultural and historical sites throughout the United States. You can search for nearby sites, take a walking tour, create your own itinerary, or simply go for a walk or drive and let Clio show you nearby sites using our mobile app. Clio is non-profit and free for everyone thanks to the support of people like you. Donations are tax- deductible! Click here to learn more!

Madison Incline

Historic Sites, Monuments, Landmarks, and Public Art ()

Listen

Built from 1836 to 1841, this large incline plane crosses over Crooked Creek and cuts through solid limestone. The incline provided rail service to Madison, allowing trains to deliver goods to the Ohio River. As the Ohio River lessened in importance, so did the incline. The incline is no longer used today, but visitors can see the railroad tracks and hike the trails that run parallel to the incline.

The stone arch culvert over Crooked Creek as it appears today. The railroad built this culvert in 1863 after the original culvert washed away in 1844.

Listen

         The Madison Incline Plane is the steepest non-cog standard gauge railroad in the United States and dates back to the founding of the Madison and Indianapolis Railroad in 1836.  Madison Indiana is surrounded by a large set of hills. To move freight from the interior of the state to the port at Madison, a large inclined plane was needed to overcome the hills. The plane was built in three sections, starting in 1836 and finishing in 1841.  It is 7,012 ft. long with an elevation of 413 feet, giving it an approximate grade of 5.89%.1  

        The Madison and Indianapolis Railroad was conceived during the period of internal improvements and chartered in 1832.2  Railroad promoters advertised the new line as the cheapest way to deliver products to the Ohio River.  Proponents saw the railroad as absolutely necessary for the development and growth of Indiana.3  During the early days of railroading in the United States, railroads were used as feeder lines, allowing more goods to reach rivers, which were the major highways of their time.  They were not seen as independent transportation networks. This view made Madison a natural choice for a railroad terminus, as it provided excellent access for the transfer of goods to the Ohio River.4  The promoters were correct, and in the mid 19th century the railroad grew the Madison economy.  Specifically the railroad’s transportation of pork from the interior farmlands to the Ohio River helped Madison become a “porkopolis”.5

Construction began on September 16th 18366 under the direction of Thomas Morris.7 The construction took in two sections.  The biggest cut required one hundred and seventeen feet of excavation through solid rock and has a length of 1,150 feet.8  The railroad awarded contractors William Stough and A. W. Flint the construction contract for the first section of the incline.9  During the excavation process, gunpowder would be used to loosen rock, which would then be carried away in handcarts.10

            Labor on the incline consisted mostly of Irish immigrants. Though the number of laborers varied depending on the report, documentation suggests between 1000 and 1400 men were used to construct the first fifteen miles of track.  The majority of these laborers were employed on the incline.11  Between seventy and one hundred laborers built the “big cut”.12  These laborers would be paid fifteen dollars a month and would receive between “1 and 8 jiggers of whiskey a day” (roughly one to four ounces). The more whiskey a foreman gave out, the better workers he would get.13 The Irish lived near the site of the incline, and the area today is known as "Irish Hollow".

Motive power on the incline has had three key forms of power.  After its completion, teams of horses pulled individual train cars up the incline.  Train cars were allowed to travel down the incline by gravity.14 In 1847, the railroad installed a cog system on the incline, and a special geared steam locomotive pushed trains up the hill.  This system was not satisfactory, and the railroad moved to replace it.15  The result was the creation of the Reuben Wells, a locomotive heavy enough to not slip when pushing trains up the hill.  The locomotive was the basis for all future incline trains until they were replaced by diesel locomotives in 1953.16  Today, the Reuben Wells can be seen in the Indianapolis Children's Museum.

Currently the incline is not in use, but visitors are able to walk along trails installed by the Heritage Trail Conservancy and get a good view of the incline and the stone arch culvert that carries the incline over Crooked Creek.

Sources

[1] Excerpts from the Report of the Principal Engineer to the State Board of Internal Improvement for the Year 1837, Railroad Collection (MC-0012) Carton 1, Jefferson County Historical Society Research Library, 3. [2] The Village at the End of the Road, a chapter in early Indiana Railroad History, 17. Madison Jefferson County Public Library, Indiana Collection. [3] The Village at the End of the Road, a chapter in early Indiana Railroad History, 20-21. [4] Zimmer, Donald Madison, Indiana 1811-1860: A Study in the Process of City Building. (Jefferson County Historical Society, Madison IN, 2007). 60. [5] Current Events Club, “History and reminiscences of the Madison and Indianapolis Railroad Company” in Early History of Madison and Jefferson County. Unpublished MSS in Madison-Jefferson County Public Library, Madison, Indiana. 50. [6] Sulzer, Elmer. “America’s Steepest Railroad: Pennsy’s Madison Hill Takes Honors at 5.89%”. Railroad Collection (MC-0012) Carton 1, Jefferson County Historical Society Research Library. [7] Becker, M.J. The incline plane railroad at Madison, Indiana; its history and operation, 1878. Railroad Collection (MC-00012) Carton 1, Jefferson County Historical Society Research Library, 69. [8] Zimmer, Madison, Indiana 1811-1860, 2007. 62. [9] Current Events Club, “History and reminiscences of the Madison and Indianapolis Railroad Company” in Early History of Madison and Jefferson County. 42-43. [10] Zimmer, Madison, Indiana 1811-1860, 2007. 62. [11] Zimmer, Madison, Indiana 1811-1860, 2007. 61. [12] Excerpts from the Report of the Principal Engineer to the State Board of Internal Improvement For the Year 1840, Railroad Collection (MC-00012) Carton 2, Jefferson County Historical Society Research Library, 3. [13] Elvin, Robert. “Semi Centennial: Railroading Fifty Years Ago, From Madison to Indianapolis, The Pioneer Road of the West”, 1888. Robert J. Elvin Collection (MC-0007), Jefferson County Historical Society Research Library. [14] Steinberger, Samuel. Recollections of My First Days as An Apprentice in Machine Shop on the Madison and Indianapolis Railroad, Railroad Collection (MC-0012) Carton 1, Jefferson County Historical Society Research Library, 5. [15] Anderson, Phil, Pioneer Railroad of the Northwest: A History of the Jeffersonville, Madison, and Indianapolis Railroad (Jefferson County Historical Society, Madison Indiana, 2013) 23. [16] Anderson, Pioneer Railroad of the Northwest, 2013, 24-25.

Hours
Open 24 hours a day
Tags
  • Business and Economic Development
  • Railroads and Transportation
  • Science and Technology
This location was created on 2016-03-22 by Robert Wolfe .   It was last updated on 2016-03-22 by Clio Admin .

This entry has been viewed 436 times within the past year

Comments

  • No comments found.

Join The Discussion

Only registered users can comment. Registration is completely free!

Login / Register

ResponsiveVoice used under Non-Commercial License