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Historic Downtown Augusta (Broad Street)
Item 9 of 16
Designed by prominent Georgia architect G. Lloyd Preacher and Company, the 8-story Richmond Hotel was constructed in 1923 on the site of the Albion Hotel which burned in 1921. The building's design is of the Italian Renaissance Revival style indicated by the rectangular form, entablature, and rhythmic placement of the windows. Completed for occupation January 1923, The Richmond Hotel was converted into the Richmond Summit in 1979.

View of Richmond Hotel from I.M. Pei City park

View of Richmond Hotel from I.M. Pei City park

Perspective Shot of Richmond Hotel with Adjacent Albion Avenue C.1979

Perspective Shot of Richmond Hotel with Adjacent Albion Avenue C.1979

Street View of Hotel Richmond C. 2014

Street View of Hotel Richmond C. 2014

East-Facing Perspective Rendering of Albion Hotel C. 1922

East-Facing Perspective Rendering of Albion Hotel C. 1922

G. L. Miller and Company issued the bonds for the hotel’s construction as reported in the Augusta Chronicle April 30, 1922 which cost $660,000 to build. The J. B. White Estate also played a role in the development of this significant downtown property; at the time the famous Augusta Department store was located adjacent to the Albion Hotel site and was also damaged by the disastrous fire. The estate invested in the hotel to prove their “faith in Augusta” and offer further improvements of the downtown infrastructure including sidewalks and streets that were fifty feet wide. An Augusta Chronicle Article cited the Albion hotel as "having no place as the leading hotel of a city like Augusta" due to its modest appearance, and that the construction of the Richmond hotel would resolve the issue due to its 75 feet high and 200 feet deep structure. The building was reported to be completed for occupation January 1923. 

In 1979, the Richmond hotel was converted into 125 subsidized one-bedroom apartment units for the elderly each of about 600 sq feet. The first floor would host units to accommodate the handicapped and the remainder of the first floor would house commercial spaces. The Albion Avenue was closed to vehicle traffic in order to establish a resident courtyard. In the early 21st century, the Richmond summit experienced an increasing rate of crime and a deteriorating living condition for its residents. The issues have since then been resolved, and the Richmond Summit continues to house resident for subsidized rent. 

Carter, John S. “Public Funds to Aid Project.” Augusta Chronicle, 24 Jan. 1979.

Historic Augusta Vertical Files: 740-750 Broad Street Richmond Hotel

Staff. “‘The Richmond," 8-Story Commercial Hotel to Go Up on the Site of the Burned Albion.” Augusta Chronicle, 30 Apr. 1922.

Image Sources(Click to expand)

Historic Augusta Vertical Files: 740-750 Broad Street Richmond Hotel

Carter, John S. “Public Funds to Aid Project.” Augusta Chronicle, 24 Jan. 1979.

Historic Augusta Vertical Files: 740-750 Broad Street Richmond Hotel

Staff. “‘The Richmond," 8-Story Commercial Hotel to Go Up on the Site of the Burned Albion.” Augusta Chronicle, 30 Apr. 1922.