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The Rutland Railroad is located in the northeastern of the United States, in the state of Vermont, more precisely in the city of Rutland. It is extending into the state of New York, both his northernmost and southernmost ends. It was built between 1843 and 1963. The Rutland chartered the Rutland & Canadian Railroad to build north from Burlington, Vermont, to Canada and connect the Rutland with the Ogdensburg & Lake Champlain in Alburgh, Vermont. (“History”)


  • Rutland Railroad map
  • Picture of Rutland Railroad
  • Picture of Rutland Railroad

Timothy Follet was the owner of a steamship business on Lake Champlain and when the industrial revolution persevered he saw a way to use the Champlain & Connecticut River Railroad for a greater purpose and thus in October 1843 it was chartered by the state of Vermont (American-Rails.com). 

In 1847 Follet renamed the railroad, it was now called the Rutland Railroad (American-Rails.com). It was built between Rutland and Vermont, connecting the two cities together which was part of Mr. Follet’s greater plan for a thriving business since Connecticut trains using this route ran along bodies of water such as the Connecticut River, the Williams River, linking to Mt. Holly (Wikimedia Foundation). During the fall of 1849, the railroad was completed (American-Rails.com). A race between a team of horses and a train was held to see who could get from one city to the other the fastest, the train won by two hours (American-Rails.com).

Another railroad chartered that year was the Vermont Center Railroad which was organized by Charles Paine (American-Rails.com). This railroad was set to go through White and Onion River valley which will go through Mr. Paine’s hometown and in turn enable him to gain a personal fortune (American-Rails.com). In 1901 the Rutland Railroad constructed a pathway that goes across Lake Champlain, through the Champlain islands to connect between BurlingtonBurtlington, Vermont and Rouses Point, New York (Wikimedia Foundation). The purpose of this construction was to get ahead of their competitors, the Vermont Center Railroad, by giving them tracks that will give them access to Canada (Wikimedia Foundation). However, towards the end of the Rousse Point tracks, both companies ended up sharing a bridge that will get them to their destination (Wikimedia Foundation). 

The Railroad was 400-mile long and serviced Vermont and Northern New York up until the 1960’s. In 1898, it started to expand up until 1902 (RRHS, 2019). The Rutland chartered the Rutland & Canadian Railroad to build north from Burlington, Vermont, to Canada and connect the Rutland with the Ogdensburg & Lake Champlain in Alburgh, Vermont. The Ogdensburg and Lake Champlain was a railroad that had been cut loose from Central Vermont because of Bankruptcy (RRHS, 2019).

With expansion, the railroad reached Quebec. It connected many cities like Bennington, Chatham. New York and Vermont. That’s why it gained the name of “The Corkscrew” (RRHS, 2019). Rutland purchased it and in 1902, it was 413 miles long, running from Ogdensburg, New York to Bellows Falls, Vermont, with different lines going to Chatham and to Montreal (RRHS, 2019). Rutland purchased it and in 1902, it was 413 miles long, running from Ogdensburg, New York to Bellows Falls, Vermont, with different lines going to Chatham and to Montreal (RRHS, 2019).

in 1911, the company was sold again for half its interest to the New Haven Railroads (American-Rails.com). As the years went by the company went under drastic changes, which resulted in the declining of revenues, labor strikes and money troubles  (American-Rails.com). During the 1960s1960’s the company eventually collapsed (American-Rails.com). In 1962, the railroad assets were sold and the company was renamed in 1964 to The Rutland Corporation. The company-owned company-owned real estate and purchased other companies with the sale money. The Rutland Corporation was purchased in 1968 and was integrated into the Walter Reede Company ending it’s 125-year125 year existence (RRHS, 2019). The system is still operating still operates today by the Green Mountain and Vermont Railway which enables passengers to enjoy Vermont’s beautiful scenery (American-Rails.com). Its main office is based in Rutland Vermont at 118 Post St, Rutland, VT 05701 (Google Maps).

“History.” Rutland Railroad Historical Society, 27 Mar. 2014, www.rutlandrr.org/history/. Accessed 12 Dec. 2019.

‌“Rutland Railroad Archive.” Rutland Railroad Archive, 2019, sites.middlebury.edu/rutlandrr/. Accessed 12 Dec. 2019.

“Rutland Railroad.” American-Rails.Com, 2011, www.american-rails.com/rutland.html#gallery[pageGallery]/1/. Accessed 12 Dec. 2019.

Wikipedia Contributors. “Rutland Railroad.” Wikipedia, Wikimedia Foundation, 24 Sept. 2019, en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rutland_Railroad. Accessed 12 Dec. 2019.

Image Sources(Click to expand)

Wikipedia Contributors. “Rutland Railroad.” Wikipedia, Wikimedia Foundation, 24 Sept. 2019, en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rutland_Railroad. Accessed 12 Dec. 2019. ‌

Richard Leonard's Random Steam Photo Collection -- Rutland Railroad 4-8-2 91 By Container: Railarchive.net Year: 2019 URL: https://www.railarchive.net/randomsteam/rut91.htm

Pinterest By Container: Pinterest Year: 2019 URL: https://www.pinterest.com/pin/788763322208427426/visual-search/?x=16&y=11&w=530&h=354