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The National Bank of Summers was built c.1890 and remained the home of the bank until a new bank was built at the corner of Temple and Second Ave (now Summers County Library) The bank was headed by James T. McCreery, president, C.B. Mahon, Vice-President, J.H> Jordan, Cashier, and O.P vine, Assistant Cashier. This commercial building represents Queen Anne-style commercial design in Hinton from the late nineteenth century and, as a corner building, is a pivotal element in the streetscape both of Third Avenue and Temple Street. It dates from within the period of significance, retains integrity, and although altered from the original is nonetheless a contributing feature within the context of the Hinton Historic District.


This is a Queen Anne style commercial building of brick, on a corner lot, with a cantilevered hexagonal oriel on the southwest corner (a.k.a. touret), formerly capped with a corresponding rood. The Third Avenue facade is 3 bays in width, while that along Temple Street is five bays. The storefront has been altered. Upper-story fenestration is flat-topped and segmental-arched 1/1, with some windows hacing more elaborate heads than others, perhaps suggesting more important historical uses. The touret was removed in World War 2, as it was made out of metal to help off-set the shortages of metal.

This building has gone through many businesses in its time.

In 1996, the Church and School of Wicca headquarters were relocated to Hinton, WV, after the founders, Gavin and Yvonne Frost moved to the area. The Church, which was formed in 1968 in St. Louis, MO, is notable for being the first Craft correspondence school and for being the first officially recognized Pagan-based place of worship by the IRS, which it achieved in 1972. The Church was also involved in the Dettmer v. Landon case in 1985, which resulted in Wicca being recognized as a legitimate religion by the United States District Court for the Eastern District of Virginia. The Church and School of Wicca still offer classes to new students on the official website, though headquarters are not open to visitors.

Today it is used as a resale shop.

Adler, Margot. Drawing Down the Moon: Witches, Druids, Goddess-Worshipers, and Other Pagans in America. Penguin, 2006.

"Frost, Yvonne and Gavin," Occult World. Accessed October 18th 2019. http://occult-world.com/famous-witches/yvonne-and-gavin-frost/.

"Herbert Daniel Dettmer, Appellee, v. Robert Landon, Director of Corrections, Appellant, 799 F.2d 929 (4th Cir. 1986)," Justia. September 4th 1986. Accessed October 18th 2019. https://law.justia.com/cases/federal/appellate-courts/F2/799/929/117777/.

Knowles, George. Gavin and Yvonne Frost, Controverscial. May 7th 2017. Accessed October 18th 2019. http://www.controverscial.com/Gavin%20and%20Yvonne%20Frost.htm.

"Sidney Gavin Frost," Pivont Funeral Home. September 11th 2016. Accessed October 18th 2019. https://www.pivontfuneralhome.com/obituary/3940440.

"The Founders of Wicca," The Church and School of Wicca. Accessed October 18th 2019. https://wicca.org/the-founders-of-wicca-in-the-u-s/.