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This historic home was completed in 1894 for the family of William E. Haymond, a leading citizen of Sutton who owned several businesses and worked as an attorney. The home overlooks the Elk River and its original Queen-Anne design remains mostly intact. The home is listed on the National Register of Historic Places for its architecture and its connection to Haymond.


  • Photo postcard of Stonewall Street in Sutton, ca. 1910. The Haymond house can be seen at center left.
  • William Edgar Haymond house today
  • Stairs
  • Original gas lighting fixture
  • Original lincrusta wall trimming
  • Original electric lighting fixture on stairs
  • Original floors and light fixture
  • William Edgar Haymond

Located next to the Elk River in Sutton, the William Edgar Haymond House dates back to 1894. Haymond hired Edward Bates Franzheim, a well-recognized architect from Wheeling to design the home. The house's sits on its original sandstone foundation and is held up by four round order Doric columns. It’s Queen-Anne style also reflects from Franzheim’s design and is one of the home's notable qualities to this day. Other things in the house that remain in their original condition include hardwood floors, stairwells, the lincrusta wall coverings, and the lighting fixtures, which are a mixture of gas and electric.

Haymond is remembered for his contributions to law and industrial interests in this area of West Virginia. William Edgar Haymond was admitted to the Bar in Sutton in 1879. He was elected Prosecuting Attorney for Braxton county in 1884 and served in that capacity for eight years. Haymond was also chief council for E.D. Fulton of New York vs Geo. J. Gould, The Little Kanawha Syndicate and others, in which about 50,000 acres of coal land was involved in Braxton and Gilmer counties. For his services in this suit he was paid thirty five thousand dollars, which today would be a little over 1 million dollars. Also, he notably worked to support the extension of the Coal & Coke Railroad, a development that brought considerable growth to the town of Sutton.

William E. Haymond sold his house in 1922 and the next owners endeavored to maintain the property and keep most of its original design. The most notable alteration is the addition of aluminum siding to the exterior which occurred in the 1980s. Due to the home’s preservation and connection to Haymond’s influential life, the house was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 2004.

The home is currently in excellent condition and is being offered to the public for touring. The big attraction being the paranormal tours. It is believed the spirits of William and his first wife Emma Haymond (along with a few others) still roam the halls today. The new owners have started the restoration process and all proceeds from these tours are used for that reason.

1. History of Braxton County and central West Virginia. Internet Archive. . Accessed February 20, 2019. https://archive.org/stream/historyofbraxton00sutt/historyofbraxton00sutt_djvu.txt. 

2. National Register of Historic Places Registration Form. West Virginia Culture. . Accessed February 20, 2019. http://www.wvculture.org/shpo/nr/pdf/braxton/04000356.pdf.

3. Photo of Edward Bates Franzheim. Ohio County Public Library. Accessed February 20, 2019. http://www.ohiocountylibrary.org/wheeling-history/4249. 

4. Photo of William E. Haymond House. Old House Dreams. Accessed February 20, 2019. https://www.oldhousedreams.com/2018/07/09/1884-queen-anne-sutton-wv/.

Image Sources(Click to expand)

"View of Stonewall Street, Sutton, W. Va.," West Virginia HIstory OnView, West VIrginia and REgional History Center, WVU Libraries. https://wvhistoryonview.org/catalog/041832.

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