Waldomore is located in the heart of downtown Clarksburg, West Virginia. The structure began as a family home for Clarksburg resident Waldo P. Goff, but later evolved into a very well-known local landmark. Since its construction, Waldomore has been known as a historic site and gathering place for the residents of Harrison County, as well as visitors from all over the state. The name of this popular landmark for the City of Clarksburg was derived by combining the names of the original owners, Waldo P. Goff, and his wife Harriet Moore. Today Waldomore is a part of the library complex.


  • This is a photo from the Clarksburg Public Library website that shows the main entrance of Waldomore.
    This is a photo from the Clarksburg Public Library website that shows the main entrance of Waldomore.
  • Black and white postcard of the Waldomore (Clarksburg Public Library).
Courtesy of the Harrison County WV Historical Society.
    Black and white postcard of the Waldomore (Clarksburg Public Library). Courtesy of the Harrison County WV Historical Society.

The original structure of Waldomore was built in 1842 by Clarksburg resident, businessman, and leader Waldo P. Goff and his wife Harriet Moore Goff. The home was meant to serve as a family residence for the couple and their nine children. Located on four acres of land on West Pike Street and North 4th Street, the home is considered a two-story Neo-Classical Revival brick mansion with two stories and multiple rooms. During the Goff’s ownership, the home underwent one renovation. This renovation took place in the early 1900s and created more space for the family.

In 1931 the Goff’s daughter, May Goff Lowndes, gave the home to the City of Clarksburg to serve as the city’s public library. During the 1930s the city renovated the home again by removing walls on the main floor to make the space larger for the library. This was also when the name “Waldomore” was developed. May Goff Lowndes decided to use a combination of her father's first name and her mother's maiden name as a way to honor them and their ownership of the home. 

Waldomore served as the public library until 1976. During this time the city built a larger structure next door to Waldomore to serve as the main city library. They kept Waldomore for private events and as the home of the West Virginia collection of the library. Two years later, in October of 1978, Waldomore was placed on the National Register of Historic Places.

Today, Waldomore continues to serve as a public meeting and event space on the first floor and the home of the West Virginia collection of the library, and the Gray Barker UFO Collection on the second. The front room of the home features a bronze plaque placed in memory of May Goff Lowndes, her family, and her family home. Visitors can view this plaque, explore the home's decor, meet with Waldomore staff to learn more about the history of the structure, and meet with the special collections librarian to learn more about the West Virginia collection. However, the Clarksburg Public Library has put in place specific guidelines for events that must be followed so it would be best for visitors to contact the library before visiting. Thanks to these guidelines, the great preservation by the City of Clarksburg, and the home’s deep historical value, Waldomore will remain part of the city’s history.

"Local History / Genealogy." Historic Waldomore. Accessed April 10, 2016. http://clarksburglibrary.info/Waldomore/home. Clarksburg Public Library Board, Waldomore. National Register of Historic Places Inventory Nomination Form. Clarksburg, WV. 1978.