The Nu Wray Inn is a historic hotel located in Burnsville, Yancey County, North Carolina. It is the oldest surviving hotel in Western North Carolina. The hotel was built in 1833 shortly after Yancey County was formed and one year before the town of Burnsville was formed. It was originally built of logs and had eight bedrooms and a dining room and kitchen. The same family owned The NU Wray Inn for over a century until the death of Rush Wray.


  • The Nu Wray Inn today
    The Nu Wray Inn today
  • The Nu Wray Inn around 1940.
    The Nu Wray Inn around 1940.
  • The Nu Wray Inn around 1900
    The Nu Wray Inn around 1900


The Nu Wray Inn is a historic inn located in Burnsville, Yancey County, North Carolina. It is the oldest surviving hotel in Western North Carolina. The inn was built in 1833 shortly after Yancey County was formed and one year before the town of Burnsville was formed. It was originally built of logs and had eight bedrooms and a dining room and kitchen.
Garrett and Elizabeth Ray purchased The Nu Wray Inn  shortly after The American Civil War. The Ray's made extensive additions to the structure, more than doubling the original floor space. These additions included a central lobby and several additional rooms. The most recent renovations occurred under the ownership of William and Julia Wray. These renovations took place from 1915 to 1917, and included the addition of several upstairs rooms and the current dining facility.  The  same family owned The NU Wray Inn for over a century until the death of  Rush Wray.
The  Nu Wray Inn is currently 16,500-square-foot and includes twenty six guest rooms, a large dining room, and a large kitchen. The Inn has been featured on ABC News. The Inn was also the only North Carolina property included in Architectural Digest's 1978 book set entitled Classic Country Inns of America. Notable guests at the inn include Thomas Wolfe, William Sydney Porter(O. Henry), Elvis Presley, Samuel Clements(Mark Twain), President Jimmy Carter, and Christopher Reeves. The Nu Wray Inn has been on the National Register of Historic Places since 1982.


http://www.hpo.ncdcr.gov/nr/yc0002.pdf http://www.nuwrayinn.com/ http://www.citizen-times.com/story/news/local/2014/12/02/historic-nu-wray-inn-gets-new-owners/19792985/ Thomas Wolfe: when do the atrocities begin? By The University of Tennessee Press. p. 55. The Yancey Times Journal (2002): The History of the Nu Wray Inn.