Writer and illustrator David Hunter Strother lived in a house at this intersection for a short time in the 1860s. He is best known for his graphic art skills under his nom-de-plume, Porte Crayon in Harper's Magazine.


  • David Hunter Strother
    David Hunter Strother
  • Front of the house
    Front of the house
  • Rear of the house
    Rear of the house
  • Gravesite of David Hunter Strother at Green Hill cemetery, Martinsburg, West Virginia.
Photo Credit: L Andrew Price
    Gravesite of David Hunter Strother at Green Hill cemetery, Martinsburg, West Virginia. Photo Credit: L Andrew Price
  • Strother home modern day Martinsburg
Photo Credit: L Andrew Price
    Strother home modern day Martinsburg Photo Credit: L Andrew Price
  • Strother home modern day Martinsburg
Photo Credit: L Andrew Price
    Strother home modern day Martinsburg Photo Credit: L Andrew Price
  • Civil War Illustration by DH Strother, located in Harper's Ferry, West Virginia.
Photo Credit: L. Andrew Price
    Civil War Illustration by DH Strother, located in Harper's Ferry, West Virginia. Photo Credit: L. Andrew Price
  • Graphic Novel by DH Strother
A Visit to the Virginian Canaan
Photo Credit: L. Andrew Price
    Graphic Novel by DH Strother A Visit to the Virginian Canaan Photo Credit: L. Andrew Price
  • Character study, DH Strother
Photo Credit: L. Andrew Price
    Character study, DH Strother Photo Credit: L. Andrew Price
  • General David Hunter Strother at Home in Berkeley Springs, WV. Photo courtesy of West Virgininia & Regional History Center.
    General David Hunter Strother at Home in Berkeley Springs, WV. Photo courtesy of West Virgininia & Regional History Center.

David Hunter Strother was born in Martinsburg, Va in 1816. Strother was taught art under Samuel Morse, the telegraph inventor, in the mid 1830s and studied art in Italy and New York City in the 1840s. Strother's knowledge of drawing helped him become a topographer where he served in the Federal Army under different staff generals during the Civil War. Strother reached the rank of Brigadier General and throughout his military service he recorded his recollections of the war that were later published as a series in Harper's Magazine.

His career as an illustrator and an author came to a close when he was appointed Consul General to Mexico by President Hayes in 1879 and served until 1885. He returned to West Virginia and died in 1888 and is buried in Green Hill cemetery in Martinsburg, WV  that he helped design.