The Woodrow Wilson Presidential Library, adjacent to the childhood home and birthplace of Woodrow Wilson, was opened to the public in 1990. The Library is open to anyone interested in learning about the life and times of Woodrow Wilson as it holds periodicals, artifacts, and archival documents from the period. The adjacent building, known as the Manse, is a museum with period furniture and seven exhibitions on Wilson and his time as president. The grounds also hold a 1919 Series 51 Pierce-Arrow limousine that Wilson used frequently for business travel.


  • Woodrow Wilson Birthplace
    Woodrow Wilson Birthplace
  • Woodrow Wilson Museum
    Woodrow Wilson Museum

The Woodrow Wilson Library was opened as an additional education space for the life of Woodrow Wilson. Researchers are able to access all archival materials at no cost. The Library has an extensive collection of manuscripts, periodicals, and photographs available for view in person and digitized online. 

The Manse, another name for a Presbyterian minister's house, was Wilson's birth place and childhood home, The house, including what is now called "the Birthing Room" are open to the public. The first floor of the building holds seven exhibits: Wilson's Family, Wilson's time at Princeton, The Governorship of New Jersey, The Presidential Years, World War I, The Treaty of Versailles, and The League of Nations. The second floor of the home is used as a special meeting room. The third floor of the home is used to store archival materials not kept in the Library. Currently only the first floor of the home is open to the public.

Also found on the grounds are a garden and the Pierce Arrow limosuine used by Wilson during his presidency. Originally, the space where the garden sits on the grounds was used for livestock grazing and outbuildings. In 2008 The Garden Club of Virginia refurbished the garden area, adding additional plants and restoring the fencing. 1919 Series 51 Pierce-Arrow limousine was gifted to the Woodrow Wilson Birthplace Foundation by Wilson's widow, Edith Bolling Galt Wilson. The limousine was restored to working order and is maintained by the museum.