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Before the coming of the railroad, the town site of Wenatchee gravitated around Miller’s trading post located on North Miller Street, and extended at least as far south as Springwater Street. The Columbia Valley Bank began business on April 29, 1892, in a frame building on Miller Street near the corner of Springwater Avenue. The bank was opened primarily for the purpose of cashing checks of the labor crews clearing right of way and laying track for the Great Northern Railroad. With the coming of the railroad and the construction of the depot at the foot of First Street, the town was relocated around the area of the depot. The small wooden bank building was loaded on a wagon and moved to the southeast corner of the intersection of Orondo and Wenatchee Avenues. The bank built the first brick building in Wenatchee in 1894. It also housed the Wenatchee World until 1910 when the newspaper moved into the World Building on Mission Street between Orondo and Palouse. In 1906 the bank had its third “home” built. It was a three-story building which served the bank until 1951, when a new building was constructed. In 1968-69 the “new” building was remodeled and the parking area was enlarged. The Columbia Valley Bank later became known as the National Bank of Commerce, and then the Rainier Bank, now it serves as the home of Key Bank located at 102 S. Wenatchee Avenue.


  • An interior photo of the tellers counter at the second home of Columbia Valley Bank.
  • The second home of Columbia Valley Bank on the southwest corner of Orondo Street and Wenatchee Avenue.
  • An illustration by artist Betty Bell of the second home of Columbia Valley Bank.
  • An illustration by artist Betty Bell of the third home of Columbia Valley Bank.

Before the coming of the railroad, the town site of Wenatchee gravitated around Miller’s trading post located on North Miller Street, and extended at least as far south as Springwater Street. The Columbia Valley Bank began business on April 29, 1892, in a frame building on Miller Street near the corner of Springwater Avenue. The bank was opened primarily for the purpose of cashing checks of the labor crews clearing right of way and laying track for the Great Northern Railroad.

With the coming of the railroad and the construction of the depot at the foot of First Street, the town was relocated around the area of the depot. The small wooden bank building was loaded on a wagon and moved to the southeast corner of the intersection of Orondo and Wenatchee Avenues.

The bank built the first brick building in Wenatchee in 1894. It also housed the Wenatchee World until 1910 when the newspaper moved into the World Building on Mission Street between Orondo and Palouse. In 1906 the bank had its third “home” built. It was a three-story building which served the bank until 1951, when a new building was constructed. In 1968-69 the “new” building was remodeled and the parking area was enlarged. The Columbia Valley Bank later became known as the National Bank of Commerce, and then the Rainier Bank. It is now the home of Key Bank located at 102 S. Wenatchee Avenue.

Polk Directories. Wenatchee, WA. 1907-2006.

Image Sources(Click to expand)

Wenatchee Valley Museum & Cultural Center Photography Collection # 58-9-35

Wenatchee Valley Museum & Cultural Center Photography Collection # 75-49-34

Wenatchee Valley Museum & Cultural Center Collection # 89-36-9

Wenatchee Valley Museum & Cultural Center Photography Collection # 89-36-10