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This is a contributing entry for Fort Hartsuff State Historical Park and only appears as part of that tour.Learn More.

Typically 1870’s Army posts with both Infantry and Calvary were laid out so that the infantry barracks were on one side of the parade ground with a mirror image cavalry barracks on the other side. Fort Hartsuff was no exception. But when the post was downsized to a single company of infantry, the cavalry barracks were no longer needed to house the cavalry personnel. What was needed was a place to house the quartermasters and commissary material.


  • Buggy inside the Storehouse
  • Buggy inside the Storehouse
  • Wagon inside the Storehouse
  • Quartermaster Storehouse
  • Sign for Quartermaster Storehouse

Typically 1870’s Army posts with both Infantry and Calvary were laid out so that the infantry barracks were on one side of the parade ground with a mirror image cavalry barracks on the other side. Fort Hartsuff was no exception. But when the post was downsized to a single company of infantry, the cavalry barracks was no longer needed to house the cavalry personnel. What was needed was a place to house the quartermasters and commissary material. As was the case with the post hospital, the plans were changed and the existing foundation was used to form a thirty foot by one hundred foot warehouse. Sentries were posted in and around the storehouse as the post’s remoteness and scarcity of supplies made pilferage a continual problem

Domeier, Jim. "The Guide to Fort Hartsuff (1874-1881)." . .