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This is a contributing entry for Fort Hartsuff State Historical Park and only appears as part of that tour.Learn More.

Even by today’s standards, the Commanding Officers Quarters is a large house. By 1870’s standards, it must have seemed like a mansion. Designed and constructed as the personal home of the Commanding Officer, his family, and his servants, the quarters were quite luxurious. They helped to earn Fort Hartsuff the honor of being “The most pleasant duty station in the Department of the Platte.”


  • Commanding Officers Quarters
  • Commanding Officers Quarters

Even by today’s standards the Commanding Officers Quarters is a large house. By 1870’s standards it must have seemed like a mansion. Designed and constructed as the personal home of the Commanding Officer, his family and his servants, the quarters were quite luxurious, and helped to earn Fort Hartsuff the honor of being “The most pleasant duty station in the Department of the Platte”.

Officers typically hired a favorite older enlisted man to serve as his personal servant or ‘striker’. These strikers were also known as ‘dog-robbers’ because they often ate the officers’ family leftovers. The Commanding Officers’ Quarters were inhabited by Captain Samuel Munson, Co. C 9th U.S. Infantry; Captain (Brevet Colonel) John J. Coppinger, Co. A 23rd U.S. Infantry; Captain G.S. Carpenter, Co. K 14th U.S. Infantry and again by Captain Munson.

The Commanding Officers’ Quarters is not open to public touring.

Domeier, Jim. "The Guide to Fort Hartsuff (1874-1881)." . .