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This is a contributing entry for Fort Hartsuff State Historical Park and only appears as part of that tour.Learn More.

If Post Headquarters was the brain of the fort, then the barracks was the heart. Most of the forty to sixty enlisted men stationed at the post lived here. When viewed today with very few people in it, the barracks seem huge. However, when filled with a full company of soldiers, the barracks would seem crowed with a decided lack of privacy.


  • Soldiers Barracks
  • Barracks Dining Hall
  • Barracks Kitchen
  • Barracks Kitchen
  • Barracks Kitchen
  • Soldiers Barracks
  • Enlisted Men's Barracks

If Post Headquarters was the brain of the fort, then the barracks was the heart. Most of the forty to sixty enlisted men stationed at the post lived here. When viewed today with very few people in it, the barracks seem huge. However, when filled with a full company of soldiers, the barracks would seem crowed with a decided lack of privacy.

The attached dining hall is where the enlisted men were fed. The non-commissioned officers (Sergeants and Corporals) ate at separate tables and set their table with nicer furnishings such as tablecloths and special Company and Regimental marked china.

On the left wall as you enter the dining hall, you will find a piece of Plexiglas. This Plexiglas serves two purposes. It allows you to see the lath and plaster construction used in all the inhabited buildings, and secondly it protects the signature of Lee Herron, a Medal of Honor recipient. He was the Chief Engineer in charge of the steam powered sawmill at Fort Hartsuff during its construction. He signed his name on a 1926 visit.

Domeier, Jim. "The Guide to Fort Hartsuff (1874-1881)." . .